Episode 7

Tim Jones

Tim is originally from Florida and has resided in New Hampshire for over 20 years. He has been married to his wife, Karen, for 25 years, and Tim also has two beautiful children, a dog, and a cat.

Before moving to New Hampshire, Tim spent six years in the US Navy. He served as a Deep Sea Diver and was stationed in Pearl Harbor, HI., and San Diego, CA. After leaving the Navy to pursue law enforcement, Tim moved to New Hampshire and started his education. He attended the New Hampshire Technical Institute and ultimately obtained his Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice. Tim later obtained his Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice Administration from the University of Phoenix. Tim also holds a Master’s in Business Administration.

Tim became a New Hampshire certified police officer in 1996 (110th Academy) as a member of the Litchfield Police Department. He worked there as a Patrol Officer for two years before moving to the Londonderry Police Department. Tim spent the remainder of his career with the Londonderry Police Department.

In total, Tim has 20 years of law enforcement experience. He retired on May 31, 2016. Over Tim’s career, he served as Patrol Officer, School Resource Officer, SWAT Operator and Sniper, Detective, Patrol Sergeant, Detective Sergeant, and ultimately as a Lieutenant. Tim has an extensive amount of experience with testing new candidates for police officer positions, as well as with conducting background investigations. As a supervisor, Tim has become well versed with the minutia of testing, interviewing, evaluating, and investigating prospective police candidates. In addition, he has assisted many other New Hampshire police agencies with their hiring and promotional processes.

Tim served as a supervisor for 11 years. He attended several law enforcement leadership courses, including the Massachusetts Leadership Institute and the FBI LEEDA Command Leadership Course. Tim authored the curricula for the first-line supervisor leadership development class, the report writing class and co-authored the advanced leadership course. Tim has an extensive history with teaching, both with his prior agency and with his company.

https://www.gs-pcc.com/about-us/

The Police & The People Podcast

https://www.gs-pcc.com/the-police-and-the-people-podcast/

Transcript Here

CATO Study here---> LINK

CG 8225: The People and the Police

Here is a link---> Here

Case Study

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlTRDq-CsZo

Creator(s): Office of Economic Opportunity. Office of Public Affairs. 1964-1981 (Most Recent)

Series: Motion Picture Films From the "Police" Program Series, ca. 1971 - ca. 1971

Record Group 381: Records of the Community Services Administration, 1963 - 1981

Production Date: 1971

General Note(s): Credits: Id/Dir. Robert Pierce.

Contributor: Producer, Office of Economic Opportunity. Made by Guggenheim Productions.

Scope & Content: Documentary: Documents the early, turbulent years of OEO'S experiment in police-community relations in Washington, DC R.1: Police and citizens express their attitudes toward each other. A citizens committee is appointed by the D.C. government, but dissension ensues over control of the program. Project director, Robert Shallow addresses the group; community leader Marion Barry urges citizen control, A pilot precinct is finally selected. R. 2: Police engage in training sessions, and community leaders struggle to replace the committee with elected representatives. A citizens' board is elected and the white project leader is replaced by a black official, Fred Lander. R. 3: Dissension between OEO and the community continues, but several programs including citizen riders, an emergency center, local police recruiting and an escort service, get underway. The board continues to struggle, and the program is refunded. At the films close, a small boy expresses his bitterness towards the police.

Contact(s): National Archives at College Park - Motion Pictures (RD-DC-M), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road

College Park, MD 20740-6001

Phone: 301-837-3540, Fax: 301-837-3620, Email: mopix@nara.gov


National Archives Identifier: 73174

Local Identifier: 381-P-1


https://catalog.archives.gov/id/73174

Transcript
Ed Watters:

Police relations in America. They appear to be at an all time low. Is that really true? Personally, I don't think so. Today's guest Tim Jones, we speak about just that community relations between citizens and police officers. We've had history of some bad things. But through training, we can make things right. That's what Tim Jones does. He trains police officers. I'm super excited.

Gareth Davies:

Hello, good evening. Good morning. Good afternoon, wherever you may be around this wild, wacky and sometimes disturbing world of ours. Yes, that's the intro to the Mindset podcast, a weekly attempt to open eyes and shedding light on what's really going on in the world. All done by ripping apart the media madness that masquerades as news. Join me, Gareth Davies. Every Sunday on the

Ed Watters:

To overcome, you must educate. Educate not only yourself, but educate anyone seeking to learn. We are all Dead America. We can all learn something. To learn. We must challenge what we already understand. The way we do that is through conversation. Sometimes we have conversations with others. However, some of the best conversations happen with ourselves. Reach Out and challenge

Tim Jones:

Sure, sure. So, first, my name is Tim Jones. I hail from the great state of New Hampshire, the Granite State, hence the name of my law enforcement training company. A little bit about me. You may actually detect a little bit of a southern accent that comes out occasionally I was born and raised in the panhandle of Florida. right near the right near Pensacola on the Florida Alabama

Tim Jones:

patrol Sergeant for a few years, and then also as a Detective Sergeant. And then in 2010, I was promoted to Lieutenant throughout my career as a Lieutenant. So in 2013, I started a law enforcement training company that you mentioned earlier, Granite State Police Career Counseling, or GSPCC, is what we call it. And, you know, I started off with one curriculum, which was helping people learn how

Tim Jones:

as I was mentioning earlier, we don't really do the podcast anymore, because of just time constraints. You know, we're running this company. And he's director for police academy, and I do quite a bit of teaching at a college here in New Hampshire. So we're just just our time is very limited. So we had to kind of cut the podcast out, which was too bad. So a little bit a little more about me, just

Ed Watters:

That's beautiful, Tim, a well rounded life. You know, it sounds nice. But it wasn't nice all the time, was it?

Tim Jones:

No, no, you always have hiccups in life, you know? Absolutely. But, you know what, what I think is what makes builds character is how you deal with adversity through these hard times in life. So

Ed Watters:

that is right. You know, the reason I have you on the podcast mainly is the police relationship in America it's, it's kind of in a bad situation right now. A lot of it is ignorance. People don't understand the law. At this point in time I'm wondering if some police officers really understand the law. And since you train police officers, you're a great candidate talked about all these

Tim Jones:

Great question. So yes, and no. It depends on which area you're talking about. So the way police training is typically structured and the oversight is each state is in charge of their own, what they call a post, which is a police officer Standards and Training. And, you know, they all do it differently, you know, but what they typically do is a their main line or their main

Ed Watters:

Yeah, You know, basically, that's, that's one of the difficult areas in America right now, is the training. And I really feel that we need to get a standardized set of training where every police officer must do these practices. It's, it's, and I'm not a police officer, I don't know how police officers work. And I know they're under a lot of stress all the time. But standardized

Tim Jones:

I completely agree. And there's actually an organization. It's actually a private organization it's called CALEA, CA, L, EA. And I don't ask me what it stands for, I don't remember. But what what they do is what they just started as these police chiefs that got together and said exactly what you're saying we need to standardize, basically, policies and procedures, which cover

Ed Watters:

Yes, I agree. The police are out there, you know, especially right now, they've got to be like a nervous individual. It's, it's one of those jobs that it's touchy in all areas. How often do police officers deal with post traumatic stress disorder? And is there a mental health evaluation that goes along with this?

Tim Jones:

That's a great question, Ed, so ironically enough, our company just launched the class called critical incident management. And this this guy, Rob Beckleson, called me out of the blue and said, Hey, I want to talk to you about a possible class. And it's, it's for people that for police officers that have gone through certain incidents and maybe are suffering from PTSD because he did it

Tim Jones:

when you're in a, in a shooting situation where you have to defend your life or someone else, you know, that is traumatic for cops. Despite what the media may make you think, I don't know a single police officer that gets up every morning and says, I want to go shoot somebody today. You know, they're prepared, they trained for it, and they have the weaponry. But they don't want to do it. You

Ed Watters:

Yes, yeah, I agree. 100%, the, you have to give the support, because that's what police officers are actually out there for is to support the community. And if we're not showing our support back, it's not going to work. You know, I get mad at police officers all the time. But still, I recognize there's a need for these people. And if they weren't there, our life would be hell. So

Tim Jones:

I've never heard of that, Ed, so I guess the answer is no, at least, not that I've ever seen. I know that if

Ed Watters:

it's called CG eight, two two five, back from

Tim Jones:

I've never heard of that. Wow. I'm gonna have to write that down because maybe I can talk about that with my students. So I can tell you all that, you know, in the 1980s, you know, the c ack epidemic happened, right. And there was a lot of pressure put on law enforcement, then to really ratchet down this because of the, you know, the perceived issue with it. Plus, it was very addicti

Tim Jones:

ave actually police public relations divisions, you know, where people go out and do different things with the community. You know, I had a criminal justice professor that one time back in the 90s, te l me that she didn't agree with that. She thought that was the wrong way to look at it that you shouldn't have certain people designated to be your PR people that everybody should be your PR peop

Tim Jones:

At the basically the, the kind of we get some pushback on this from some of our police administrators, but our chief set out putting all of our policies on our website, every single one of them. And they like they were some officers that were saying, well, we don't want to talk about any kind of tactics that we're going to use and our police chief said I put them all they're all going out there

Ed Watters:

Yeah. So, you know, that leads back to the officers need to know the law, but also, we need to be an informed citizen. And we need to know the law. So we're not breaking the law. So I really think we need to train not only the officers, but community. Back in school with the constitution and civics, you know, yes, we've lost all of these things. And I think we need them back,

Tim Jones:

yeah, that's, that's it. Yeah. I was telling my wife that the other day, that it's just it's saturated everything. It saturated this virus. Yeah. It just seems like people are now just losing their minds. Because you're choosing a side, you know, whether you have an R or D in front of your name, and it just boggles my mind. We're all in this together, you know let's be, sensible a

Tim Jones:

the egos. That is a big thing. I feel that, you know, there are a lot of police officers that have big egos and and they don't like, you know, when when people push back, but things are changing now. And that's because, you know, if, if there is any positive or silver lining on what's going on right now is everything is being recorded now. Yes, either by a bystander or the person that's being

Ed Watters:

Yes. You know, I received a telephone call from a prisoner that was sent to the Idaho State mental hospital. And he reached out to me from the mental hospital. And he was talking about how the police officer, he had interactions with him from previous incidences, but he was allowed to be transported and drugged, and basically put in a straitjacket because of an officer's ego. And

Tim Jones:

Yeah, that's an interesting topic. So it's funny, you know, I, as a professor, I teach data collection, especially in the realm of criminology. And I found it very interesting that the the domain mechanisms of collecting data, which is the FBI, they have what they call the UCR. Lastly, they're replacing the UCR with something called NIBRS, which is the National Incident based, incident

Tim Jones:

We probably won't see, like statistics from it for a couple of years. It takes a while for these things to shake out. So that'll be something we see down the road. I did read an article one time where this guy did it in Florida, specifically in Florida. This is before the FBI started collecting the OIS data. And he went through and collected it all but it was a lot of work. He had to call basically

Ed Watters:

Another subject I want to touch on is militarization of the police and reconizing the police. We see this build up of armored vehicles SWAT really has taken off. And I recognize there is a use for that type of unit. Yeah. But how do you feel? Has it been used properly?

Tim Jones:

That's a great question. And as you and I were talking, before we started recording about my perspective. And I'll bring this up now in that, you know, I worked in New Hampshire, we have fairly relatively low crime rates in New Hampshire. I was just saying that they probably have three times as many puppies and more than that then homicides in major cities than in the entire state of

Tim Jones:

which was a regional team, it was made up of multiple agencies. We obtained an armored vehicle.

Tim Jones:

It was a company called Bearcat. I believe, and it's this this, this big old giant it's basically like a troop carrier, but it's armored, right, so you can put your guys in the back. And but one of the main missions that we saw it for or its use was rescues. So picture, if you will, a police officer is walking up to a call at a house, maybe a domestic, and he gets shot before in the front yard.

Tim Jones:

of my perspective on it. But if I can, I will say, I have noticed another trend. And it's I I'm a traditionalist, you know, I started law enforcement in 96 plus I was in the military, Ed, I'm a big, I'm a big advocate of a squared away uniform. I just think it sends the message that you're, that you're a squared away police officer, and there's actually been research done that there are some

Tim Jones:

They actually match your shirt. And they have just traditional pockets, from the distance that you can't even tell.

Tim Jones:

The, I think that's more of a way to go. In my opinion. Again, I just think that departments need to be careful with how their officers look out there, and, because, you know, if you look like you're, you know, guarding an embassy in, you know, in Israel, then people may be less apt to want to come up and talk to you and discuss. A good point.

Ed Watters:

Yes, yeah. That's a real good point right there. How you present yourself really determines how you're going to be approached. Yes. Another big thing is complaints. I'm guilty of this myself, you know, having a complaint with the officer, you have a bad day, you get pulled over and you disagree with the officer. You know, it's not the place. That officer is to do a duty and it gets

Tim Jones:

You're absolutely right. You know, every state has a mechanism where you can go to court, you know, you can fight if you fight your ticket or the or the arrest or whatever. And that's the place to do it. Okay. I'll tell you that for your listeners out there. If you give the officer a lot of attitude on the side of the road, and they're probably gonna annotate that in their notes. Every

Tim Jones:

know, and talk to him there so you're not on the side of the road. Right. Now, if you go in with attitude, and yelling, and all that, it's you're not going to get anywhere, okay? They're humans, and they don't want to be yelled at, even though they're probably a little more calloused than, than most. Because it varies so much. However, they doesn't mean they like it.

Tim Jones:

As far as complaints, though, about a police officer, you know, I encourage people to to complain, I mean, it's now just know that you gotta have your ducks in order or your ducks in a row. When you do it, you can't just go in and you know, and say, Well, I just didn't like getting the ticket. Well, then whoever you're talking to is going to say, well, that's what the court process is for, you

Tim Jones:

that we also put compliment forms out there too. You know, so people can come in and say, you know, if an officer did a good thing, they can fill that out as well. So it's not just a mechanism to to go after the police it's also a mechanism to compliment them. So that's, that's pretty much my take on the whole complaint thing. Just Just a side note, you know, as a former supervisor, I would take

Ed Watters:

Yes, well, yeah, I've actually approached an officer. He was actually out of line at Walmart. And I kind of lightly told him, Hey, can we talk about this? You know, he, he basically copped an attitude and said, You got a problem, you go see my boss, and I ended it right there and said, alright, have a good day. And I went directly to the sheriff's department. And we spoke with the

Tim Jones:

There's and you know what, and I always tell police officers to and especially, you know, the ones that are going to college who want to be police officers is to you can always fall back on the Peelian Principles. Do you know what those are? I'm not aware of those. Alright, so

Tim Jones:

the first Metropolitan Police Department was organized in in London, the guy who kind of put it all together, his name was Robert Peel. And he created these these principles, the Peelian Principles, and there are nine of them, I encourage your listeners to look them up. And but when you read them, it boils down to this. The police are the people and the people are the police, you are an arm of

Tim Jones:

out there. And so don't treat everyone the same because they're not.

Ed Watters:

Yeah, well, that brings up a real interesting point. We all have bad days. officers have bad days. Yeah. I think that if they're having a bad day, like we all work we get sick days. I think officers should have the ability to say, Hey, I'm having a bad day. I cannot deal with this today. I need a break and not be punished for that. So I really feel that something like that being

Tim Jones:

Yeah, kind of like a, you know, mental break day, you know, just so you can. Yeah, I mean, you know, most police departments have ample sick time for their officers. You know, but I'll take it even further, Ed, is that, you know, police departments need to make sure that they're hiring people that have good emotional intelligence that can deal with their own emotions that can process

Tim Jones:

to understand communication skills, you know, how to basically de escalate things, or not make them worse, you know, so, yeah, I like what you're saying that we should have, like a mental break capability for officers, but also police departments need to work really hard to hire good people and really push for college educated. Actually, California, I think they introduced a bill, I don't

Ed Watters:

I think temperament really plays a key role. And yes, you know, if you can't internally, make logic of things in, in a quick, responsible way. You probably shouldn't be a police officer. So, I agree with that, yeah. Well, I could go on and on and on for hours. I really wish your podcast would keep going. If you can work that out. I think it's a very beneficial thing for the public. Is

Tim Jones:

Sure, I would say, you know, get educated on what's truly going on. The police are not the enemy. We're not. Are there some bad apples, yeah. I actually just just printed out a study that I was going to use for one of my classes and it's from this Dolan Group, consulting group. And this this one particular statistic was staggering, it said that in 2014. And it just talks about different

Ed Watters:

Yes, you can. How can people find you?

Tim Jones:

So our law enforcement training company is, again, it's Granite State Police Career Counseling. But GSPCC is what we go by the the website is GS, hyphen, PCC.com again, GS hyphen PCC.com. You can find us on Instagram, also on LinkedIn. Those are the two main social media platforms that we use. I'm pretty active on on Instagram, I like to put a lot a lot of funny stuff out there about

Ed Watters:

Before I let go, Tim, I was doing some research in the Cato Institute, did a wonderful survey, and a study complete study I'll actually link it to this podcast episode. Okay. But it tells the people exactly what you just said. The media is inflating a lot of this and when you look at the numbers the relations in America is not quite as bad as what people are seeing on the news. And

Tim Jones:

Yep. Yeah. It's like making these large, large decisions, policy decisions based on a tiny little snapshot. Yes. You know, what happened with George Floyd, You know, I we can probably talk about that for a full hour as well. But the optics were horrible. And what, you know, the the officer did there with a knee on him would not be something I would do. I would never do that in a million

Ed Watters:

And we have to recognize that. Jim, it's been a pleasure talking with you about all of this, and I highly recommend people getting a hold of you and looking you up. Thank you for being on the Dead America podcast.

Tim Jones:

Thank you so much Ed, I truly appreciate it, man. Take care.

Ed Watters:

Thank you for listening in to the podcast episode today. If you enjoyed it, please share it with a friend. Also, please follow us on any of your podcast players. And that's going to finish up this episode of the Dead America podcast. Make sure you come back next week and follow along for another great interview. I'm Ed Watters, out.

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Ed Watters

You will find that Ed Watters looks at the world with open eyes. He sees things with education in mind along with self-improvement. The podcast Ed delivers is intended on uplifting and identifying the inner psyche of one's self to promote better living in one's own life. With life experience, he looks for ways to tell stories to help others identify with the hardness of day to day life. Ed is always open to hearing your story and help get it out to the world.
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